Menu
Class Dojo
For the most up to date information regarding the Coronavirus, please follow this link. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-educational-settings-about-covid-19
Home Page

Knowle Primary School Every Child Matters. Every Moment Counts.

Class Dojo
  • Caterpillars: 344
  • Butterflies: 364
  • Dragonflies: 578
  • Hedgehogs: 323
  • Squirrels: 515
  • Badgers: 760
  • Foxes: 597
  • Otters: 468
  • Kingfishers:
  • Woodpeckers: 296
  • Falcons: 213
  • Kestrels: 569
Class Attendance
  • Caterpillars 93.3%
  • Butterflies 83.7%
  • Dragonflies 93.6%
  • Hedgehogs 94.3%
  • Squirrels 96.2%
  • Badgers 98.3%
  • Foxes 89.7%
  • Otters 94.6%
  • Kingfishers 94.4%
  • Woodpeckers 91.9%
  • Falcons 95.3%
  • Kestrels 92%
Overall Attendance: 0

Tuesday 19.05.20

English

Still image for this video

Story Challenge!

 

Watch this funny animation Oktapodi.

 

Story Ideas you could choose from:

 

  • Retell the narrative as it appears, using rich description and vivid imagery. 
  • Write an alternative story, involving a different animal.
  • Write a story with a flashback, perhaps the octopus wakes up in the truck and a flash back takes place remembering the tank.

 

You will need to think about:

  • Who you are writing as.  Are you the delivery/truck driver, the octopus who was snatched from the tank or the octopus chasing the truck?
  • Build tension, make it exciting - Show me, don't tell me!
  • If you include dialogue, check your punctuation!

 

Today you are going to start your story. Think about using:

  • Some interesting sentence openers and varying sentence structure.
  • A wide range of punctuation (, . : ; ! “ ?).
  • Ambitious vocabulary.
  • Expanded noun phrases to describe the setting and the characters.

Maths

 

 

Maths Reasoning

Science

Still image for this video

Activity:

After you have watched the video and read the facts below, please research another sea creature (perhaps another marine invertebrate) and compare it to the octopus. You could create a table or diagram to show the similarities and differences between the two animals, looking at the animals’ characteristics, habitat, body shape, behaviour, diet and defences. As a more creative activity, you could use the information in our primary resource to write a poem about octopuses.Ready to get up-close and personal with one of nature’s quirkiest creatures? Then check out our awesome octopus facts!

Fast octopus facts

Scientific name: Octopoda
Family name: Octopodidae
Classification: Invertebrate
Lifespan (in wild): 1-2 years
Weight: 3-10kg
Body length: Generally 30-90cm (some species can grow to 5.4m!)
Top speed: 40km/h
Diet: Carnivore
Habitat: Ocean

Octopuses are sea animals famous for their rounded bodiesbulging eyes and eight long arms. These cool critters live in all the world’s oceans, but they’re especially abundant in warm, tropical waters. Like their cousin, the squid, octopuses are often considered ‘monsters of the deep’, lurking in the depths of the seas. However, there are some kinds of octopus that live in relatively shallow waters.

Most octopuses stay along the ocean’s floor, although some species are ‘pelagic,’ meaning they live near the water’s surface. Other octopus species live in deep, dark waters, and rise from below at dawn and dusk to search for food. They perform their famous backward swim by blasting water through a muscular tube on their body called a siphon. They also crawl along the ocean’s floor, tucking their arms into small openings to search for food.

Favourites on the octopus’ menu include crabs, shrimps and lobsters, but they will sometimes eat larger prey, too, such as sharks. When going for grub, octopuses typically drop down on their prey from above, and then use the powerful suctions that line their arms to pull their victim into their mouth.

Octopuses themselves provide tasty meals for other sea creatures, such as seals, whales and large fish, who like to gobble them up. But these eight-armed animals have a few cheeky tricks to help defend themselves! If threatened, octopuses shoot an inky fluid from their body that darkens the water around them, confusing the aggressor. They can also hide and blend in with their surroundings, too, by changing colour to grey, brown, pink, blue or green. Impressive stuff! As well as for camouflage, these incredible invertebrates use colour change as a way to communicate with other octopuses.

For the most part, octopuses are solitary creatures and live alone in dens made from rocks. And check this out – they build their dens themselves by moving the rocks into place with their powerful arms. Cool, eh? These brilliant builders sometimes even fashion a rock “door” that pulls closed when the octopus is safely inside the den.

Although octopuses are not considered endangered, they do face dangers from human activity. Such threats include habitat destruction, and a reduction in their main foods due to over fishing and marine pollution.

Learn all about these fascinating sea creatures and how they have adapted to life in oceans around the world. How do octopuses defend themselves from predators? Why do octopuses have blue blood? Which species of octopus lives at depths of up to 4,800m?

 

Maths Answers - No peeking!
Class Dojo
  • Caterpillars: 344
  • Butterflies: 364
  • Dragonflies: 578
  • Hedgehogs: 323
  • Squirrels: 515
  • Badgers: 760
  • Foxes: 597
  • Otters: 468
  • Kingfishers:
  • Woodpeckers: 296
  • Falcons: 213
  • Kestrels: 569
Class Attendance
  • Caterpillars 93.3%
  • Butterflies 83.7%
  • Dragonflies 93.6%
  • Hedgehogs 94.3%
  • Squirrels 96.2%
  • Badgers 98.3%
  • Foxes 89.7%
  • Otters 94.6%
  • Kingfishers 94.4%
  • Woodpeckers 91.9%
  • Falcons 95.3%
  • Kestrels 92%
Overall Attendance: 0
Top